Deconstructing C.S Lewis on Reasoning to Atheism

Over the past few months I’ve seen this quote bouncing around Facebook occasionally and picked it as the topic for my new blog article.

The quote can be found here: C.S Lewis on Reasoning to Atheism

“Supposing there was no intelligence behind the universe, no creative mind. In that case, nobody designed my brain for the purpose of thinking. It is merely that when the atoms inside my skull happen, for physical or chemical reasons, to arrange themselves in a certain way, this gives me, as a by-product, the sensation I call thought. But, if so, how can I trust my own thinking to be true? It’s like upsetting a milk jug and hoping that the way it splashes itself will give you a map of London. But if I can’t trust my own thinking, of course I can’t trust the arguments leading to Atheism, and therefore have no reason to be an Atheist, or anything else. Unless I believe in God, I cannot believe in thought: so I can never use thought to disbelieve in God.”

Each time I’ve read this, I’ve been completely baffled by the quote. On my mission I encountered some leaders who were really big C.S. Lewis fans, and even got a few quotes that I liked myself, but never have I encountered such a weird and circular quote.

So OK, here goes Mr Lewis:

“Supposing there was no intelligence behind the universe, no creative mind.”

OK, we are speaking hypothetically. We are supposing that the universe has no (I assume “creative”) intelligence behind it. We are pretending to be atheists for a moment while we consider an argument.

“In that case, nobody designed my brain for the purpose of thinking. It is merely that when the atoms inside my skull happen, for physical or chemical reasons, to arrange themselves in a certain way, this gives me, as a by-product, the sensation I call thought.”

That would be correct. We obtained a brain via millions of years of evolution which had no intelligence behind it. OK.

“But, if so, how can I trust my own thinking to be true?”

OK, just wait a second.

Where was the jump (from):

  1. A creative intelligence designing our brains (to)
  2. Us being able to trust that our own thinking is true

?????

Embedded in this argument appears to be some kind of assumption. The assumption is that if a creative intelligence is behind the creation of our brains, then we can trust them to think “true thoughts”. How on earth does that work??

The reason I say that assumption is present, is because this is a “counterfactual” argument; saying that IF there were no creative intelligence THEN we couldn’t trust our thoughts to be true. The corollary is implied.

Whence the assumption that even with a creative intelligence behind it all we can trust our thinking to be true?? No matter who you are, no matter which human being on this planet, you think you are right about your worldview. By definition, that means everyone else varies from slightly wrong to very wrong (according to you). Hence YOU trusted your thoughts to be true, and so did they (everybody else), yet somebody is wrong (presumably everyone else).

Regardless of whether there is a creative intelligence behind our brains, we cannot trust our thoughts to be true “just like that”. Because so many people are thinking inaccurate thoughts.

“It’s like upsetting a milk jug and hoping that the way it splashes itself will give you a map of London.”

Another massive jump! Whence the jump from being able to or not being able to trust our thoughts to the Boeing 747 argument?

I presume this is some obscure reference to the theory of evolution. If it indeed is, then it’s obvious Mr Lewis completely misunderstands evolution.

“But if I can’t trust my own thinking, of course I can’t trust the arguments leading to Atheism, and therefore have no reason to be an Atheist, or anything else.

As mentioned above, regardless of whether there is a creative intelligence, you can’t trust your thinking to be true. This argument can be turned on its head as well (which could be inferred from the “or anything else” part) — in a universe without God, thoughts leading to theism would be inaccurate and “untrustworthy” too, we’d just never know! This could possibly be the reality we live in!

“Unless I believe in God, I cannot believe in thought: so I can never use thought to disbelieve in God.”

Another very strange jump — what exactly does it mean to “believe in thought”? (I presume it means believing that our thoughts are, or can be true). Why does God have to exist in order for our thoughts to be “true”?? I genuinely don’t see the connection. In any case I’m sure atheists “believe in thought” AKA they believe we are capable of knowing “the truth”.

Conclusion

This quote is really one of the weirdest and most circular arguments I’ve ever heard. I think essentially it goes like this:

  1. In a universe without God, our brains evolved just by chance (OK)
  2. Brains that evolved “just by chance” are super-duper unlikely. (This demonstrates a lack of understanding of how evolution works)
  3. Brains that evolved just by chance “can’t” be thinking truth — (??) We can’t trust them to think truth — (??)
  4. Because they can’t think truth, their thoughts and arguments about atheism can’t be true — (but then thoughts about theism can’t be true either?? In a universe without God there might still be theists!)
  5. Presto! There must be a creative intelligence then!

I still acknowledge the possibility that I just totally misunderstood the quote. Please, anyone, enlighten me.

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Book Review: The Divine Reality: God, Islam & The Mirage of Atheism – Shawn's Odyssey

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